Greek Egg Mug

Prep Time: 1 minute, Cook Time: 3 minutes, Yields: 1 serving

This delicious Greek egg mug cup is packed with protein and ready in just 4 minutes!

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup chopped spinach

  • 1 tablespoon onion, chopped

  • ½ cup Eggland's Best Liquid Egg Whites

  • 2 tablespoons diced tomatoes

  • 2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese

  • Basil, garnish


Instructions:

  1. Spray a large microwave-safe mug with nonstick cooking spray.

  2. Add spinach and onion; microwave for 1-2 minutes, until softened.

  3. Dry up any excess liquid from the spinach with a paper towel.

  4. Add Eggland’s Best Liquid Egg Whites and microwave for 1 minute.

  5. Stir in remaining ingredients. Microwave again for 1 minute or until egg whites are just set.

  6. Stir and allow to slightly cook before enjoying!


Recipe by Eggland’s Best 

Eggs...To EAT or NOT TO EAT?

Dear Confused Client,

Let me begin by saying thank you for reaching out and seeking my advice on this topic. Please know you are not the only one confused, the latest study about eggs and their impact on heart health has left many people asking: “Are eggs good or bad for me?” I hope my response helps you understand how to apply the study findings to your own life.

On March 15, 2019, the journal JAMA released a study, Associations of Dietary Cholesterol or Egg Consumption With Incident Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality. This study found that eating three to four eggs per week was linked to a 6 percent increase in a person's risk of developing heart disease and an 8 percent increase in their risk of dying from any cause during the study period, compared with not eating eggs.

The initial shock that consumers (along with health and nutrition experts) felt is understandable. Since 2016, when the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans were released and the recommendation on limiting eggs because of cholesterol was dropped, we (as a society) have been on an egg-cellent egg cooking, egg consuming journey. (*Note, when I reference the term “we” I am referring to our general society and how “we” have perceived nutrition information or misinformation.)

However, before the 2016 report was released, there was a general consensus among consumers and many health experts that consuming too many eggs or other foods high in cholesterol was associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Nutrition and health experts recommended limiting egg consumption to 3 - 4 egg yolks a week.

With the surge in diet trends such as low carb, paleo and keto - along with the new “green light” to eat more eggs, we did what we do best - we assumed that if there is no limit on eggs, then more must be better! We stopped eating eggs in moderation and instead began to eat eggs for breakfast, at lunch and dinner. New food trends emerged serving fried eggs on salad, burger, pizzas and more. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Americans are now consuming 280 eggs per person per year, which is significantly more than consumed a decade ago.

I am sharing this to say I don’t believe eggs are bad or need to be avoided, as they do provide a variety of nutrients such as protein, essential amino acids, iron, and choline. However, this also doesn’t mean they should be consumed in unlimited quantities. There has been a lot of research published on this topic and the general consensus finds that low to moderate egg consumption (about 3 - 4 yolks per week) is not associated with an increase in heart attack or stroke.

At the end of the day, the full spectrum of your nutrition and lifestyle habits matter and will impact long-term health and disease. Eat more plant-based foods, limit animal products, eat more fiber-rich foods (from plant-based sources) reduce added sugars in the diet, if you drink alcohol, drink in moderation and participate in regular physical activity.

Please remember we can also set up an appointment to discuss in further detail and customize a nutrition plan to maximize your health.

Sincerely,

Juliana

Daily Mantra: "I am Enough"

Here is a list of short mantras you can repeat to yourself to empower yourself to love yourself just as you are.

  • I am perfectly imperfect. My imperfections make me unique in this world. I embrace my imperfections and embrace the imperfections of my loved ones.

  • I choose my path. My path may include bumps, uphill climbs, and even a few detours, but these obstacles make me stronger and wiser as I continue on the journey.

  • I choose to be grateful for all of it.

  • I have done enough for today and I did the best I could today.

  • I have everything I need.

  • I am worthy of love. I am worthy of being cherished by others.

  • My gifts are worth sharing with others.

  • I will not compare myself to my family or friends, I am on my own journey.

  • I will walk my path and support my loved ones as they walk their path.

  • I am strong enough to handle whatever is given to me.

  • I trust that I will find the strength within me to do what I need to do if an obstacle feels too overwhelming for me.

  • I am tougher and braver than I appear.

  • I got this!

  • I am enough.

Beyond a Sweet Treat: 7 Perks of Dark Chocolate

Beyond simply tasting delicious, a dose of dark chocolate adds a variety of health perks that are sure to have your body (and taste buds) thanking you! The good-for-you properties actually come from the minerals and antioxidants found in the cocoa, hence why the darker the chocolate (think 70% or higher), the better for your health. 

7 Perks of Dark Chocolate


1. Enhances Brain Function.
 Yup, it’s true - a small dose of dark chocolate may help you think better. Dark chocolate is naturally rich in the stimulants caffeine and theobromine, two compounds that can add a short term boost to overall brain function. Theobromine has been found to improve focus, concentration and visual processing of information. Dark chocolate may also improve blood flow to the brain.

2. Rich in Antioxidants including Polyphenols, Flavanols, and Catechins. The darker the chocolate, the more antioxidant power, which means the more perks for your health!

3. Decreases Cancer Risk. The antioxidants found in dark chocolate have been found to neutralize free radicals that increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, enjoying a dose of dark chocolate can help decrease cancer risk.

4. Improved Heart Health. Researchers have linked the flavonols in cocoa to decreasing cholesterol levels, blood pressure and arterial plaque.

5. Lowers Blood Pressure. The flavanols in chocolate have been found to support the production of nitric oxide, which in turn helps relax blood vessels and improve blood flow.

6. Mood-Boosting. This one comes as no surprise, but there is scientific evidence that supports the fact that dark chocolate really does make people happier. Not only does it add a sweet treat, but it will help boost endorphins, lifting your mood.

7. Bonus Nutrients. While dark chocolate doesn't provide a significant amount of essential nutrients, it is rich in iron, fiber, copper, magnesium, zinc and phosphorus.

And don’t forget there is no BAD food. Everything can be enjoyed in moderation.

One Sheet Pan Tuscan Chicken

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 lbs chicken breasts skin on, cut into halves if needed to make each piece equal in size (For a healthier version, remove the skin before cooking)

  • 12 oz small new potatoes, sliced 

  • 8 oz button mushrooms

  • 1 yellow onion, sliced

  • 3-4 cloves fresh garlic, minced

  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes

  • 1/2 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes

  • 1 cup green, or black olives, pitted

  • 2 Tbsp avocado oil, or olive oil, divided

  • 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

  • 1 Tbsp raw honey

  • 1 tsp oregano

  • 1 tsp thyme

  • 2 Tbsp fresh thyme, chopped for garnish

  • sea salt & pepper, to your taste 

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350f.

  2. Line a baking tray with foil, then place the chicken breast in the middle and the potatoes on the sides.

  3. Drizzle with 1 Tbsp oil, and season generously with sea salt and pepper.

  4. Roast in the preheated oven for about 25 minutes.

  5. In a large bowl, add in the mushrooms, tomatoes, olives, sliced onion, garlic and sun dried tomatoes.

  6. Drizzle remaining oil, balsamic vinegar, raw honey and add all the seasonings. Mix well to get all veggies coated.

  7. Once the chicken is almost cooked, add the veggies mixture to the sheet pan, and roast for an additional 10 minutes, or until the chicken is golden brown and fully cooked.

  8. Remove from the oven and garnish with fresh thyme and season to your taste.

  9. You may keep it in the fridge for a max of 4 days for food prep.

Enjoy!

by Rachel Maser @ cleanfoodcrush.com

Tips for Creating Healthy Dining Habits

  1. Fill up on fiber and lean protein. 

    A meal high in protein and fiber can help keep you satisfied and prevent overeating. Use the Fast Casual Cheat Sheet in this newsletter, to help identify best meals to fill you up!

  2. Be stingy with the extras. 

    Things like bacon, cheese, mayo, and salad dressings will not only add to your food bill but also add unnecessary calories and fat to your meal.

  3. Watch out for the sneaky salad toppings. 

    While salads can be a nutrient-packed meal, they can also be higher in calories, fat and sodium than a hamburger. Fancy toppings like cheese, bacon, salad dressing, dried fruit, nuts, and croutons can really add up.

  4. Substitute sides. 

    Most restaurants default to serving fries, chips, onion rings, bread or mashed potatoes as their side. Often these are eaten out of habit and not because you are really hungry and need the extra food. Ask if you can substitute the high-calorie side dish with a side salad and light dressing, steamed veggies, baked sweet potato or a fresh fruit cup.

  5. Embrace the flavors of baked, broiled, grilled chicken or roasted lean meats.

    Avoid fried and battered foods as they are high in calorie, fat and sodium. By shifting your mindset to embrace the flavors of baked, broiled, grilled chicken or roasted lean meats you are opening yourself to a new relationship with food.

Vegetable Minestrone Soup

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

  • 2 large carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped (about 1 cup)

  • 2 stalks celery, sliced (about 1 cup)

  • 1 large onion, chopped (about 1 cup)

  • 4 cups Vegetable Broth

  • 1 can (about 15 ounces) kidney beans, rinsed and drained

  • 1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes, drained

  • ¼ cup uncooked pearl barley

  • 2 cups firmly packed chopped fresh spinach/Kale


Heat the oil in a 4-quart saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the carrots, celery, and onion. Cook for 5 minutes or until the vegetables are tender-crisp, stirring occasionally. Stir in the broth, beans, tomatoes, and barley and heat to a boil. Reduce the heat to low. Cover and cook for 30 minutes or until the barley is tender. Stir in the spinach and cook until the spinach is wilted. Season to taste.

Yes, you can enjoy the Holiday Season eating healthy!

The holidays are a time for family, friends, good food and creating great memories. Our schedules are filled with shopping, decorating, and holiday party hopping. The busy days can make it challenging to maintain healthy exercise and sleep habits, making it easy to turn to food for a quick energy rush or comfort when feeling sad or lonely. 

When you combine lack of sleep with skipped workouts and poor food choices, it is easy to see why so many people complain of weight gain over the holidays. However, with a few simple strategies, you can fend off the unwanted holiday weight gain and prevent unhealthy habits from sabotaging the season!

Here are some of my favorite tips:

#1 Sip on soup. Soup is a low energy dense food, which means it provides fewer calories per gram - therefore you can eat a nice serving of soup, relatively low in calories. Having a cup of broth-based soup before a meal can help fill you up, so you don't overindulge in higher-calorie foods.

Bonus Tip: eat soup 30 minutes before your main meal to let your stomach register your food, helping to eat smaller portions of the more calorie-dense foods being served.

#2 Move away from the munchies. When socializing, avoid positioning yourself close to the appetizer and hors-d'oeuvre spread. This will not only help keep you more engaged in the conversation, but you will also not be tempted to eat between every other word. By stepping away from the food, you can focus on the people you are with.

Bonus Tip: When you eat, serve yourself on a plate. Think about the food you are eating, enjoy the smell, taste, and flavors of the meals. When talking, talk.

#3 Stock up on healthy foods. Prepare for your success by planning in advance. Be aware that life will get busy, you will get hungry, and your body will need food to function. Therefore, empower yourself by stocking up on nutritious and portable foods you can stash in your desk, car, gym bag, briefcase or purse.

Bonus Tip: Avoid going shopping or to a party on an empty stomach. Keep office goodies out of view or in an inconvenient location.

#4 Delay satisfaction. What should you do if you are at an office party? Instead of depriving yourself, which will probably lead to overindulging later, take it home for later. Often times delaying satisfaction can lead to realizing you did not need another serving or save it for when you can you can slow down and savor it.

Bonus Tip: Allow yourself to be more flexible this time of year. By giving yourself permission to savor holiday foods you'll be less likely to overeat and binge when your favorite foods are offered to you.

#5 Maintain a health and wellness journal. Food journaling has long been known as one of the most useful tools for helping people manage their weight. However, sometimes a food journal can get mentally exhausting if you are only thinking about the calories you consumed. Instead, shift the focus to health and wellness journaling. Track sleep habits, physical activity, mindful food moments, holiday joy, and if you choose to track food intake, pay attention to hunger and fullness cues along with your enjoyment of the foods.

Bonus Tip: Use the journal to explore what makes you feel both mentally and physically healthy.

Happy Holiday Season!!!

Yours in health,

Juliana

Healthy Habits To Better Blood Sugar


 Make a new holiday tradition...
 
Instead of crashing on the couch before AND after your holiday feast, create a healthier tradition by encouraging your family and friends to get outside and play a game of football or frisbee together. You could also simply take a walk with your family to prevent those spikes in blood sugar when eating larger amounts of food. Research has shown that routine physical activity can help to improve blood glucose levels and even lessen your need for insulin or oral diabetes medications. Remember, the more you move, the less spikes you will have!
 
Additional perks of exercise:

  • Increased level of good cholesterol (HDL)

  • Leaner, stronger muscles

  • Stronger bones

  • More energy

  • Improved mood

  • Lower blood pressure

  • Weight management

  • Better sleep

  • Stress management

Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars By Swerve

Ingredients

Gluten Free Cinnamon Crust

1 ½ cup Pamela’s GF Nut Flour Blend

1 cup almond flour

2/3 cup Swerve, Confectioners

10 tablespoons butter, melted (can also use coconut oil)

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Pumpkin Cheesecake Filling

16 ounces cream cheese, softened

1 cup Swerve, Confectioners

1 tsp pure vanilla extract

2 eggs (room temperature)

1 cup canned pumpkin

2 teaspoons pumpkin spice

Instructions

Gluten Free Cinnamon Crust

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Mix Pamela’s flour blend, almond flour, Swerve, melted butter, and cinnamon until well blended. Press mixture into buttered or parchment paper lined 9 X 13 casserole dish. Bake for 15-17 minutes. Edges will slightly brown. Let cool before adding filling on top.

 

Pumpkin Cheesecake Filling

Change oven temperature to 350 degrees F. In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine softened cream cheese, 3/4 cup Swerve and vanilla until well blended. Add eggs and mix just until eggs are incorporated. Mix 1/4 cup Swerve, pumpkin and pumpkin spice into a separate bowl. Take pumpkin mix and place dollops on the cooled crust. Pour cheesecake filling evenly over the cooled crust. Cut through batter several times with a knife to create marbleized effect (pumpkin will begin to look swirled). Bake for 40- 45 minutes or until center is set. Bring to room temperature and serve. You can also refrigerate the bars overnight, but let them sit out for about 30 minutes before serving.

 

Makes 20 servings.

 

Nutrition Facts: Serving Size 1 square Servings 20

Calories 220, Total Fat 20g, Cholesterol 55mg, Sodium 85mg, Total Carbs 19g, Dietary Fiber 3g, Sugars 2g, Added Sugar 0g, Swerve 13g, Protein 4g, Net Carbs: 3g

Don't Let Halloween Treats Scare You Into An Unhealthy Obsession

Halloween is here and there are savory and sweet treats everywhere. It is becoming more and more common for people to make comments about “healthy” and “unhealthy” food everyday - from the media, to your family, friends, and everyone in between. As a nutrition expert, I understand and agree with some of these comments. However, living a healthy and balanced life also means learning to enjoy food while also enjoying the experience of being with friends and family.

Heading into any social situation, especially during Halloween time, can sometimes be a little scary if you have struggled with food issues, disordered eating, or your inner food police screaming “eat this, not that”. If you have suffered from an eating disorder, you know these words and situations can trigger you back into old habits and behaviors, if you are not equipped both mentally and physically. This issue is designed, to help you enjoy the tricks and treats of the seasons without letting the food police creep into your life and take control of the fun!

Here are a three things you can start doing today to keep yourself mentally and physically strong while not getting spooked about all the “food rules” you may read about. 

  1. Avoid skipping meals. Whether it's breakfast lunch dinner snacks skipping meals is a surefire way to find yourself in a place you might eating beyond comfort a popular Halloween treat. Everyone, every once in awhile, will find themselves in a situation where they may overeat, remember you're human. However, as part of recovery, it important to practice self-care and fuel properly throughout the day. When you fuel right throughout the day, you are equipping yourself to go to a social gathering feeling satisfied and not deprived. Practicing this step can help enjoy the event while also helping you stop eating beyond comfort.

  2. Taste your treats. When deciding to enjoy a Halloween treat, like your favorite candy, cookie, or chips and dip, take the time to actually taste what you're about to eat. If you're eating out of boredom, stress or pure mindlessness this is not the time to grab that peanut butter cup. Instead wait to enjoy your treat when you have the time to sit down, taste & savor it - without any guilt!

  3. Don’t be scared to serve it up. Instead nibbling on random Halloween candy and treat throughout the evening, make a conscious decision on what you want to eat. After you make the conscious decision on what you actually want, then take the next step and serve yourself a portion on a plate. Once you have served your portion, find a place where you can sit, taste, and enjoy your food. This simple act of conscious eating will help you stay in tune with your body. As you are eating, refer back to step #2 and make sure to taste your treats...without any guilt!


Does this issue make you want to discover how you can make peace with food and enjoy more guilt free social situations? Contact me and let’s explore working together!

Inflammation and nutrition

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Inflammation is a hot topic in the world of health and nutrition. It’s the body’s natural response to an infection or injury. Without it our body would not be able to heal. However, inflammation that persists—known as chronic inflammation—plays a role in serious illnesses such as obesity, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and many types of cancer. Thankfully healthy food choices among other lifestyle choices can reduce risk of developing chronic inflammation. 
There may not be one super food to cure chronic inflammation, but a healthy and varied diet can boost the body’s immune system and reduce inflammatory stress. 

Although diet is important in fighting inflammation, other lifestyle choices that reduce risk of chronic inflammation include: maintaining a healthy weight, getting plenty of sleep and engaging in regular physical activity.

This month I’m sharing foods and spices that help fight inflammation. This month, eat well to feel great!

Enjoy all the autumn harvest has to offer by incorporating seasonal produce and spices into meals, all while fighting inflammation!
 
Cranberries
Cranberries contain phytonutrients shown to have anti-inflammatory effects on the cardiovascular system and digestive tract. Sprinkle a handful of dried cranberries in your morning oatmeal or mix with roasted nuts for a quick healthy snack.
 
Sweet Potatoes
Sweet potatoes have high amounts of antioxidants—beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin C—that have anti-inflammatory benefits. Try roasting sweet potatoes in the oven and drizzling with honey or maple syrup for a warm fall dessert.
 
Apples
Apples are plentiful in fall and have been shown to reduce inflammation through their polyphenol content. They’re great on their own for a quick grab and go snack or are delicious baked with cinnamon sprinkled on top.
 
Dates
The magnesium found in dates has been linked to reduced blood pressure and has anti-inflammatory benefits. Dates are naturally sweet and are great used in baking as an alternative sweetener or an elegant appetizer stuffed with cheese or nuts.
 
Pumpkin
Pumpkin is one of the best sources of alpha- and beta-carotene, which gives pumpkin its orange hue. The seeds are a good source of alpha-linolenic acid, known to fight inflammation. Toast pumpkin seeds in the oven and drizzle with olive oil, sprinkled with sea salt for a delicious fall snack.
 
Pecans
Pecans are a traditional fall staple, rich in magnesium and are known to have anti-inflammatory benefits. Pecans are great in salads or as a topping on hot cereal. Toasting pecans enhances their flavor.
 
Turnip Greens
The greens of this root veggie are an excellent source of vitamin K and omega-3 fatty acids, both known as anti-inflammatory nutrients. Turnip greens are great sautéed or drizzled with a vinaigrette dressing.

Ginger
 Ginger contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds called gingerols shown to help fight inflammation. Fresh ginger root can be used in teas, baked goods and most commonly in Asian and Indian dishes. Try adding freshly grated ginger to sautéed veggies or rice to spice up any dish.
 
Allspice
Eugenol is the main active compound found in allspice, which has been shown to decrease inflammation within the body. Allspice is a warming spice and has the flavors of cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and pepper. Sprinkle over roasted butternut squash drizzled with olive oil for an easy side dish.
 
Cloves
Cloves also contain the compound eugenol. Cloves are a versatile spice and is commonly used in fall recipes, from drinks to meat dishes.
 
Cinnamon
Cinnamon contains compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that may reduce the risk of cellular damage and chronic disease. Use in place of sugar in your morning coffee or tea for an alternative sweetener.

Instant Pot White Beans

Cooking beans in the Instant Pot is super fast.
This basic recipe is perfect for flavorful beans that can be used in many ways. Try them in White Bean Hummus, White Bean Pesto Pasta, and White Bean Veggie Burgers.
It’s quick to make, cheaper, healthier and more flavorful than canned beans!

Total time: 35 minutes, Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

1 (1-lb.) bag Camellia Brand Great Northern Beans, rinsed and sorted

1 tablespoon onion powder

2 teaspoons garlic powder

1-2 teaspoons salt

1 bay leaf

6 cups unsalted vegetable broth, chicken broth, or water

Directions:

Add all ingredients to the Instant Pot.
Cover, twist to lock the lid, and turn the valve to seal.
Press the Beans/Chili button.
When the timer beeps, allow the pressure to release naturally for at least 20 minutes.
Then, turn the valve to vent.
 

Enjoy cooked beans over rice, or use as you would canned beans. If not using right away, store beans along with any excess liquid, in an airtight container in the refrigerator up to one week, or freeze for up to 6 months.

 Makes 6 servings

Recipe by Camellia Brand

 

Is social media negatively impacting your health?

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Here’s some ways that social media might be negatively impacting your health.

FOMO
FOMO - the fear of missing out. While we all occasionally experience this in our day-to-day lives, Facebook only further feeds into your fear of being left out of the loop. Your need to stay connected is one of the reasons social media is so pervasive in the first place. You want to know what your peers are up to. An incredibly common phenomenon, FOMO can leave you feeling inferior to your peers and dissatisfied with your own life. FOMO means that you are spending more time than we realize scrolling through your Facebook feed instead of putting forth the effort to enjoy and improve our own life.

This leads us into the next reason why Facebook is more harmful than most people realize:

Envy
Facebook gives you a glimpse into the lives of your peers - the restaurants they eat at, the cars they drive, and the clothes they wear. It can be easy to fall into the trap of comparing your life to the image that people present on social media. However, it’s important to remember that most people strive to present their best selves on social media. It’s easy to post the good things and leave out the bad. So next time you find yourself envying one of your Facebook friends, here’s a good tip: take a step back from the screen, take a deep breath, and write yourself a quick list of things you’re thankful for. There’s probably more things on there than you realize.

Addictive Screens
Let’s face it, spending too much time staring at a screen is just plain bad for your health. Spending a lot time on Facebook or on the computer in general can cause serious health issues. From eye strain to bad posture to simply encouraging a sedentary lifestyle, these are all serious risks from spending too much time online. Of course, like anything, moderation is key so if you can’t quite go cold turkey with social media, try to limit your time browsing social media.


5 Ways to Step Away From the Screen



Limiting your social media usage can be a hard habit to break. Instead of simply cutting yourself off from the web, consciously replace your screen time with healthier activities. Your body and mind will thank you.

  1. Go Outside. Put down your phone, slip on a pair of tennis shoes, and head outside for a breath of fresh air. Whether taking a walk around the block or sitting in your backyard and taking in the views, being outdoors is great for your mental health (and the research agrees).

  2. Clean. Although cleaning might be a task you dread, research has shown it’s great for your mental health. Instead of browsing Facebook, take some time each day to declutter your space. Put in a pair of headphones, turn on some music, and get cleaning!

  3. Journal. Taking the time to sit down and reflect on your thoughts and emotions is a great way to improve your mental health, especially in today’s hectic world. Writing down your feelings is a great way to find gratitude in what you have rather than what you don’t.

  4. Call up a Friend. Instead of using Facebook to stay connected, call up a friend to hang out instead. Meeting face-to-face over a cup of coffee is a far better way to stay in touch than liking each other’s statuses every now and then.

  5. Exercise. Trade in 30 minutes of Facebook time for a physical activity: Take a trip to the gym, go for a swim, or ride your bike. Staying active is a fantastic way to keep your mind off social media.

Roasted Cauliflower and Chickpea Tacos


INGREDIENTS:

FOR THE TACOS:
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon water
1 (15 oz.) can of chickpeas,
drained and rinsed
1 small head cauliflower, washed and cut into bite-size florets
Corn tortillas
1 cup finely chopped red cabbage
1 jalapeño, sliced, seeds removed
1 large avocado, seed removed and diced
Chopped cilantro

FOR THE LIME CREMA:
1 cup plain Greek yogurt or sour cream
1/8 cup fresh lime juice
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
Salt and pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a medium bowl, whisk together chili powder, garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, salt, lime juice, olive oil, and water. Stir in chickpeas and cauliflower florets. Place seasoned chickpeas and cauliflower on a greased baking sheet. Roast for 30-35 minutes, stirring occasionally during cooking, until chickpeas are slightly crispy and cauliflower is tender. Remove from oven and set aside.
To make the lime crema, place the Greek yogurt or sour cream in a small bowl. Add fresh lime juice and cilantro. Stir well. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
Take a corn tortilla and place roasted cauliflower and chickpeas on top. Top with red cabbage, jalapeño slices, avocado, and cilantro. Drizzle lime crema over the tacos and serve!

Making peace with your weight

Making peace with your weight

Health at Every Size®: The New Peace Movement


Health at Every Size is very simply, it acknowledges that good health can best be realized independent from considerations of size. It supports people of all sizes in addressing health directly by adopting healthy behaviors.”- Linda Bacon, PhD.

The Health at Every Size® (HAES) definition of a healthy weight would be the weight at which individuals settle as they move toward a more fulfilling and meaningful lifestyle—one that includes eating in an unrestrained manner guided by internal cues and participating in enjoyable, reasonable, and sustainable levels of physical activity. This supports a holistic view of health, with a focus on feeling good about yourself, eating well in a natural and relaxed way, and being comfortably active.

For the HAES belief, thin does not necessarily indicate health and beauty, nor is fat indicative of unhealthiness or being unappealing. The creators of these beliefs believe the differences in our body shapes and sizes and our preferences for food and physical activity are what lead to our uniqueness.

Begin your journey towards loving your body:

  • Make peace with food

  • Eat in response to hunger and internal cues

  • Avoid dieting and overly restricting foods

  • Think of all foods as part of a balanced diet with variety and moderation

  • Accept that there will be times when you eat more than necessary for enjoyment or social reasons, and do so without guilt


Want to learn more? Read the HAES book or check out the HAES website at http://www.haescommunity.org/.